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one of us carries on. we talked about the acronyms each one of us uses. so, we had a real-world -- a real-live exercise that validated some of the things we talk about this morning. but it was extremely beneficial to not only the u.s. navy and marine corps, but to the international community. >> thank you. another hand? >> [inaudible] my experience with the haiti response. in this casey i was working at the deputy principal committee level and working at the white house. but it was really the first opportunity for this administration to work with a very complex response, and then recognizing for us the supported commander was usaid that normally isn't in the emergency response business. so, it was an educational process of how to move forces and yet support usaid and the role of the country team and port au prince. so, it was very informative there. and to back up when we had the first no fooling hurricane that worked its way up the entire gulf coast, the principal committee calls that were generated during the haiti response were then turned around and then bringing all o
merced and working between us and the national guard, exercising the evacuation of casualties under the control and observation of the department of emergency management, and these are things that we can only really understand through exercise, through training and then figure out where the gaps are and what we need to do to smooth those out. i'll also reference lan wilder if i can. she said something that was pretty revealing. prior to yesterday and getting out on the beach and seeing us, her thinking was just to ride out the disaster. now she feels like she's in a position where she can do some strategic thinking and strategic planning, which is really an obligation for all of us in charge. as captain jones said earlier this morning, we do not know what this is going to look like and it's certainly not going to look like what we anticipate. but having us understand how to react and how to interact with each other will give us a basis upon which we can go forward and move hopefully very quickly to salvage what we can in the event of a complex catastrophe. thank you. >> and admiral
corps. that's an area where we could use some improvement. our forces deployed to the western pacific certainly understand this, and they pass it on among themselves. the forces we deploy from southern california and the east coast that float into theater understand disaster assistance and humantarian response very well. that hasn't quite migrated itself into the institutional arena in terms of forces stationed here in the united states as it would relate to defense support to civil authorities. i think that's primarily -- this is not a primary mission for us. it's something that we do pay attention to, of course, as we deploy overseas. not necessarily forces we have here in the states. we do understand immediate response, rolling out the gate to help our neighbors in an immediate nature, but i think not so much in terms of mobilization and deploying inside our country. so, this is an area where opportunities like san francisco fleet week will allow us for, and i believe at some point really incorporate this in some internal doctrine that will benefit us in the event that this is a re
-day humanitarian assistance disaster relief. we used it as an accreditation not only for some of our adaptive force packages, but more importantly to the state of hawaii to allow them to get an accreditation that they needed for 13 of their hospitals where we set up on ford island, those familiar with the oahu island geography, we utilized ford island and we had a scenario where there was an earthquake with a resultant tsunami and mass casualties along with the destruction that goes with it to the road infrastructure and communication. and, so, we were able to parlay, if you will, this opportunity to leverage off our international partners. we had seven nations that out of the 22 that actually participated in the hadr, and there were probably also 19 of the 22 that at least observed. but there were 7 of us that actually participated. and we were able to share with each other those things that worked, those things that don't work. it's interesting because one of the things that we work very hard on was one of the things that the first panel this morning talked about, and that was communication. and
in recent years. his colleague have actually stopped using the term of "bullying" and refer to peer aggression and i can go into definitions but i won't bore you. a subset of bullying is also not on the rise and based on researchers and their samples and other scholar's work and 20% of teens have ever experienced cyber bullying and a scholar from norway published lower numbers but why be such a stickler about accurate data? because the norms for research say getting the facts out takes the tacit acceptance or fatalism out of the picture. perception changes behavior so when we connect surveys in school and own their own data and a psychology professor at university of nebraska and the vast majority of students moment engage in bullying behavior and when students find that out bullying behavior goes down further and it's a powerful resource you can use. now i'm going to introduce this amazing panel. first we have just to my right mia from sealtion. she is going to explain more about this term that was used a lot today and social literacy or social emotional learning. alice con i
use. now i'm going to introduce this amazing panel. first we have just to my right mia from sealtion. she is going to explain more about this term that was used a lot today and social literacy or social emotional learning. alice con is from cartoon network. dave steer to her right is from facebook and next to him is officer holly lawrence, sunny valley of public safety, digital safety program and she's going to talk about which is a powerful thing going national. and next -- is brian here? no. okay. all right. so we're all set and mia i would like you to enlighten us more in all that you're doing in social emotional learning. >> sure. i had some slides but i'm not sure -- no, we have a handout that went around to you and more detail about what social emotional learning is because i think we rise a little bit today and i came from seattle and i know many people have brought up that term today and i get the sense from this group that you're at kind of a high level of discourse and you have a general understanding. could i see a show of hands for those of you that social emotiona
, like those farm workers that taught us to work very hard day and night, like my mother who was a house maid in the presidio and taught me to work very, very hard everyday. like my father who is a shoe repair man in north point in embarcadero who taught me to work very hard and all those central americans who taught me to struggle and a balanced peace in our communities, so with that i would like to say it's a honor to be part of this administration and my vision is to be hold public safety in a balanced way, but at the same time looking at long-term goals that really sustain violence prevention services like a community, as a community, as a united community of san francisco, and so today i just want to honor elpueblo. [speaking spanish] , the village united will never be defeated and i trurl believe in that spirit and i honor those ancestors and all the people that taught us that concept and i hope i can bring that spirit to you and work really hard to make our community safer. thank you. [applause] >> i just have to say i have known her for the most of my working life and she's a fi
will come up with the giens and 37 factors or 40 and frankly most of us won't remember and unless we're prosecuting and looking for the elements of the crime and whether we're going to file a case or not. i i think we need to be more global than this and this works and we need to illustrate the things that aren't acceptable? what is the impact on the victim? what is the impact on everyone else? and working together to solve the problem. >> nancy. >> in some school districts and teachers when i brought up this issue i get back "you're not going to change kids being kids. some kids will pick on other kids and in the dynamic girls will be friends today and the queen bee will turn away from some girl and the enemy today and tomorrow it's somebody else, and again i agree with george and so much of this is the responsibilities falls on those adults who actually have a bird's eye ore worm's eye view of what is going on in the schools and the kids' lives and when kids don't show up for school and do more inquiry we find there is an issue around sexual harassment in the school and another
this is a learning process for adults also to move from kids will be kids and we had someone who was mean to us in school to actual bullying, but we have talked to the school districts around the state and sometimes the teachers have the blind's eye and it's more work to get involved and more work and what do relationships look like, and i agree with tony this is the beginning of relationship building, or it's a relationship going bad that could get worse. and so i think that we have a lot of educating to do. in my office we do a lot of cyber bullying training in our schools and it's amazing how much access some kids have to the internet at a really young age. they have iphones. they're on the internet. they have or smartphones. they have computers in the bedroom and parent it is never over the shoulder to see what is going online. there is a lot of unrestricted access to the internet and the internet has put it on another level and one push of a button and everybody in the school will have a picture or hear it and the outcome of that is -- it would be not just reconciling relationships o
looking at where we are 25 years later in the bay area, looking at how hard it is for us to strive to keep our theater is going, etc. i like to think that i'm not struggling quite as hard, personally, but what i mean by that, the intention, the commitment. particularly, to produce works that would not be produced in other places, and also to really nurture women of color artists. i think that is something that has not shifted for me in those 25 years, and it is good to see that brava remains committed to that kind of work. ♪ >> when people talk >> feel like it really is a community. they are not the same thing, but it really does feel like there's that kind of a five. everybody is there to enjoy a literary reading. >> the best lit in san francisco. friendly, free, and you might get fed. ♪ [applause] >> this san francisco ryther created the radar reading series in 2003. she was inspired when she first moved to this city in the early 1990's and discover the wild west atmosphere of open mi it's ic in the mission. >> although there were these open mics every night of the week, they were su
being used to address these issues being brought up by the neighborhoods affected by the project. and that's incredibly important. and, so, while speed can be sometimes a bad thing, that a slow process in and of itself is not necessarily a good thing either. that just because something has slowed down doesn't mean that that project is then deliberated appropriately. as long as the appropriate deliberations is happening, that is more than enough. and that's what's happening right now. so, again, we'd like to continue the momentum behind the warriors arena project and hopefully continue to see this project move forward and addressing these issues as well. thank you. >> thank you, mr. ryan. if there is no other public comment, and through the chair, we can close public comment. >> close the public comment. >> thank you. if i could just make some concluding comments and then turn to my colleagues. i have another meeting. i want to thank all the city departments and the warriors and also many of our community for being here today. i just wanted to state one of the public commenters ha
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)